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SEC Filings

10-K
CINEMARK HOLDINGS, INC. filed this Form 10-K on 02/28/2014
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Table of Contents

our board of directors and will depend upon many factors, including our results of operations, financial condition, earnings, capital requirements, limitations in our debt agreements and legal requirements. See Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements for further discussion of our long term debt agreements.

Provisions in our corporate documents and certain agreements, as well as Delaware law, may hinder a change of control.

Provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and bylaws, as well as provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law, could discourage unsolicited proposals to acquire us, even though such proposals may be beneficial to you. These provisions include:

 

   

authorization of our board of directors to issue shares of preferred stock without stockholder approval;

 

   

a board of directors classified into three classes of directors with the directors of each class having staggered, three-year terms;

 

   

provisions regulating the ability of our stockholders to nominate directors for election or to bring matters for action at annual meetings of our stockholders; and

 

   

provisions of Delaware law that restrict many business combinations and provide that directors serving on classified boards of directors, such as ours, may be removed only for cause.

Certain provisions of our 4.875% senior notes indenture, our 5.125% senior notes indenture, our 7.375% senior subordinated notes indenture and our amended senior secured credit facility may have the effect of delaying or preventing future transactions involving a “change of control.” A “change of control” would require us to make an offer to the holders of our 4.875% senior notes to repurchase all of the outstanding notes at a purchase price equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount outstanding plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of the purchase. A “change of control” would require us to make an offer to the holders of our 5.125% senior notes to repurchase all of the outstanding notes at a purchase price equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount outstanding plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of purchase. A “change of control”, as defined in the 7.375% senior subordinated notes indenture, would require us to make an offer to repurchase the senior subordinated notes at a price equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount outstanding plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, through the date of repurchase. A “change of control” would also be an event of default under our amended senior secured credit facility.

The market price of our Common Stock may be volatile.

There can be no assurance that an active trading market for our Common Stock will continue. The securities markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations in recent years and the market prices of the securities of companies have been particularly volatile. This market volatility, as well as general economic or political conditions, could reduce the market price of our Common Stock regardless of our operating performance. In addition, our operating results could be below the expectations of investment analysts and investors and, in response, the market price of our Common Stock may decrease significantly and prevent investors from reselling their shares of our Common Stock at or above a market price that is favorable to other stockholders. In the past, companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have been the subject of securities class action litigation. If we were the subject of securities class action litigation, it could result in substantial costs, liabilities and a diversion of management’s attention and resources.

Future sales of our Common Stock may adversely affect the prevailing market price.

If a large number of shares of our Common Stock is sold in the open market, or if there is a perception that such sales will occur, the trading price of our Common Stock could decrease. In addition, the sale of these shares could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional Common Stock. As of December 31, 2013, we had an aggregate of 180,105,414 shares of our Common Stock authorized but unissued and not reserved for

 

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