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SEC Filings

10-K
CINEMARK HOLDINGS, INC. filed this Form 10-K on 02/27/2015
Entire Document
 


Table of Contents

Item 1A. Risk Factors

Our business depends on film production and performance.

Our business depends on both the availability of suitable films for exhibition in our theatres and the success of those films in our markets. Poor performance of films, the disruption in the production of films due to events such as a strike by directors, writers or actors, a reduction in financing options for the film distributors, or a reduction in the marketing efforts of the film distributors to promote their films could have an adverse effect on our business by resulting in fewer patrons and reduced revenues.

Our results of operations vary from period to period based upon the quantity and quality of the motion pictures that we show in our theatres.

Our results of operations vary from period to period based upon the quantity and quality of the motion pictures that we show in our theatres. The major film distributors generally release the films they anticipate will be most successful during the summer and holiday seasons. Consequently, we typically generate higher revenues during these periods. Due to the dependency on the success of films released from one period to the next, results of operations for one period may not be indicative of the results for the following period or the same period in the following year.

A deterioration in relationships with film distributors could adversely affect our ability to obtain commercially successful films.

We rely on the film distributors to supply the films shown in our theatres. The film distribution business is highly concentrated, with six major film distributors accounting for approximately 82.6% of U.S. box office revenues and 47 of the top 50 grossing films during 2014. Numerous antitrust cases and consent decrees resulting from the antitrust cases impact the distribution of films. Film distributors license films to exhibitors on a theatre-by-theatre and film-by-film basis. Consequently, we cannot guarantee a supply of films by entering into long-term arrangements with major distributors. We are therefore required to negotiate licenses for each film and for each theatre. A deterioration in our relationship with any of the seven major film distributors could adversely affect our ability to obtain commercially successful films and to negotiate favorable licensing terms for such films, both of which could adversely affect our business and operating results.

We face intense competition for patrons and films which may adversely affect our business.

The motion picture industry is highly competitive. We compete against local, regional, national and international exhibitors in many of our markets. We compete for both patrons and licensing of films. In markets where we do not face competitive theatres, there is a risk of new theatres being built. The competition for patrons is dependent upon such factors as location, theatre capacity, quality of projection and sound equipment, film showtime availability, customer service quality, and ticket prices. The principal competitive factors with respect to film licensing include the theatre’s location and its demographics, the condition, capacity and grossing potential of each theatre, and licensing terms. If we are unable to attract patrons or to license successful films, our business may be adversely affected.

An increase in the use of alternative film distribution channels or other competing forms of entertainment may reduce movie theatre attendance and limit revenue growth.

We face competition for patrons from a number of alternative film distribution channels, such as digital downloads, video on-demand, pay-per-view television, DVDs, network and syndicated television. We also compete with other forms of entertainment, such as concerts, theme parks, gaming and sporting events, for our patrons’ leisure time and disposable income. A significant increase in popularity of these alternative film distribution channels, competing forms of entertainment or improvements in technologies available at home could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

 

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